Stamp Collecting Can Be Great Fun

Stamp collecting can be a fun activity not only for older people but also for kids. A person can have a pleasurable experience collecting a variety of stamps that he may find in plain binders or get through the mail. Many people find it to be a very interesting hobby. For someone starting out, he might like to compile an assortment of stamps from his album until he sees that he could concentrate on collecting these stamps.

It can definitely be an enjoyable hobby because a person can have fun and learn all kinds of information from collecting stamps. A stamp can show everything that someone can think of from people, locations, events in history, sports, cars, and much more. He may find it satisfying later on for having enough information and albums where he may showcase his collection.

He might find that he can make a profit from these items. Some stamps are very special and may highlight a famous person or event. The premium on these important stamps can be very high but it depends on how rare they are and if there are a small number of releases. They can be like other commodities where a collector may locate a dealer that can give them an estimated price of a particular stamp.

A finer choice for him to profit more from his collection is to find stamp collectors that are interested in some stamps that he might be collecting. He might advertise his collection in magazines and newspapers that have specific advertisements for unique stamps. The internet can be very useful in getting in on auction sales for his stamps. He may also confirm the most recent market price of the stamp by comparing the internet and the latest advertisements.

The asking price can be different according to inventory and production of the item. The amount of collectors that concentrate on those rare stamps is growing and limited edition stamps may provoke him to be more agressive when trying to locate these items. The high demand relates to an increased price value.

Regardless, they are more than just profiting and earning. A majority of stamp collectors believe it to be an enjoyable hobby. The pleasure he feels from locating the stamps he likes may be incomparable. People collect stamps for many reasons. In addition, one important reason they may give is that it is fun and it is very satisfying to accomplish something.

It encourages a person to learn about different things. Many stamps give insight into a country’s history and its landmarks. This is a primary reason why it is very attractive compared to other collections. A person can never get over the excitement of discovering and learning new things. If he wants to go after this hobby of being a stamp collector, here are some things to keep in mind.

1. He should be aware of which items interest him. He might begin looking for collections that can be important or special to him. He may have the choice of deciding from simple stamps that he might get from mail and postcards from binders.

2. He may go to groups and gatherings to collaborate with people. He could interact with people that are collecting things as well. He may question the person that may have some collections associated with these stamps. In this situation, he may be able to swap some of his stamps for a particular stamp.

3. He needs to make sure he uses his time wisely. He may locate places that he might find stamps with the particular theme that he collects.

4. He may find sites on the internet that will give information on how and where to locate those special and rare stamps.

5. He may pursue this hobby for as long as it is enjoyable to him. There are a wide selection of topics and themes to pick from. A collector does not limit to a particular topic.

A stamp collector should constantly think back to the significance of the things that makes him happy and gratified. He should properly take care of his collections. Stamps are very delicate. They are just pieces of paper but they have considerable value and significance.

To find more great Stamp collecting tips please visit:

http://www.MyStampCollecting.com

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I am looking for a stamp collector with interest in Vatican City stamps?

Question by rdariomty: I am looking for a stamp collector with interest in Vatican City stamps?

Best answer:

Answer by KALA KOUWA
I have Indian stamps and I would like to barter.

Add your own answer in the comments!

How Do I FInd A Stamp Collector?

stamp collector
by leewf

Question by Curtis: How Do I FInd A Stamp Collector?

Best answer:

Answer by joe s
Contact the American Philatelic Society
on-line at http://www.stamps.org/
phone: 814-933-3803

Know better? Leave your own answer in the comments!

British Mint Stamps Collectors Pack 1984

Most popular stamp collector eBay auctions:



Nice Stamp Collector photos

A few nice stamp collector images I found:

NYC: Bloomingdale’s 2009 Holiday Window – Treasures Forever
stamp collector
Image by wallyg
Treasures Forever
She loves beauty and style, and new shoes too!
But, most of all, her greatest treasure is YOU!

Bloomingdale‘s 2009 Holiday window display.

Bloomingdale’s, a chain of upscale American department stores owned by Macy’s, Inc., has 36 stores nationwide, with annual sales of .9 billion dollars. Bloomingdale’s started in 1861 when brothers Joseph and Lyman Bloomingdale started selling hoop-skirts in their Ladies Notions’ Shop on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. In 1872, Bloomingdale’s expanded and opened their East Side Bazaar, a harbinger of the modern "department store."

In 1886, it moved to 59th Street and Lexington Avenue, still their flagship store, anticipating and capitalizing on the northern movement of New York’s upper and middle classes. By 1929, Bloomingdale’s covered an entire city block. Two years later, the glamorous Art Deco edifice that still graces Lexington Avenue was completed. In 1949, Bloomingdale’s began its real expansion, opening its first satellite store in Fresh Meadows, Queens and by 1959, Bloomingdale’s had created a complete circle of stores around the flagship, in New Jersey, Westchester County and Long Island. This dramatic growth continued in the 70’s and 80’s with the opening of stores in the Northeast, Florida, and Chicago. Bloomingdale’s was on its way to becoming a true national entity. That vision culminated in November 1996 with the addition of its first four stores in California, the most ambitious expansion in the company’s history.

From the beginning, the Bloomingdale’s brothers catered to America’s love of international goods, and by the 1880’s, their European selection was dazzling. A buying office in Paris in 1886 was the beginning of a network that now spans the globe. The 1960’s brought promotions resulting from Bloomingdale’s fascination with the foreign market: the first was a small affair called "Casa Bella" featuring merchandise for the home from Italy. Over the next thirty years, the promotions took on a grand scale – including unique merchandise and cultural exhibits that would touch every department in Bloomingdale’s. Major transformation of the Bloomingdale’s image came in the 1960’s and 70’s. The promotions were so exciting that the term "Retailing as Theater" was coined to describe Bloomingdale’s "happenings." It was the era of pet rocks and glacial ice cubes, of visits by movie stars and royalty, from Elizabeth Taylor to Queen Elizabeth II.

The new direction in merchandising was both to seek and to create. Buyers covered the globe to find exclusive, one-of-a-kind items. When they couldn’t find what they wanted, they had it made. In fashion, Bloomingdale’s launched new designers and created boutiques for already-famous names. Among the discoveries: Ralph Lauren, Perry Ellis and Norma Kamali – and for the first time in America: Sonia Rykiel, Kenzo and Fendi ready-to-wear. Designers opening their first in-store boutiques at Bloomingdale’s include Yves St. Laurent, Calvin Klein, Claude Montana and Thierry Mugler.

In 1961, Bloomingdale’s made retail history in yet another area by introducing the first designer shopping bag. Artist Joseph Kinigstein was commissioned to create a bag for the "Esprit de France" promotion. Rather than doing the obvious – ladylike flowers in pastel colors – he reproduced antique French tarot cards in bold red, black and white. Most daring of all, the bag omitted the store name. Even so, it was unmistakably Bloomingdale’s, and the collector’s shopping bag was launched. Since then, Bloomingdale’s bags have been created by both famous and fledgling artists, architects and ad designers. Their designs have been featured in art museums all over the world.

In 1971 "model rooms", a highlight of Bloomingdale’s since 1947, gained worldwide attention. "The Cave," an intricate multi-level frame sprayed entirely in white polyurethane, was a spectacular example of the lengths to which Bloomingdale’s would go to make a statement of style. Over the years, the model rooms have been showcases for the talents of everyone from architect Frank Gehry to filmmaker Federico Fellini.

During the 1970’s, Bloomingdale’s was a favorite stop of the international avant-garde, epitomized locally by the "Young East Sider" who lived right in the neighborhood. In 1973 the store wanted to stamp the Bloomingdale’s name on panties to launch an intimate apparel promotion, they chose the company nickname as a nod to the young, trendy crowd, and the "Bloomie’s" logo was born. Soon, New Yorkers were affectionately referring to the city’s second most popular tourist attraction after the Statue of Liberty as "Bloomie’s" and the hottest souvenir in town was anything emblazoned with "Bloomie’s".

NYC: Bloomingdale’s 2009 Holiday Window – Merrymakers
stamp collector
Image by wallyg
Merrymakers
A Holiday party’s the perfect time to shine.
In your new dress or suit, you’ll glitter and look fine.

Bloomingdale‘s 2009 Holiday window display.

Bloomingdale’s, a chain of upscale American department stores owned by Macy’s, Inc., has 36 stores nationwide, with annual sales of .9 billion dollars. Bloomingdale’s started in 1861 when brothers Joseph and Lyman Bloomingdale started selling hoop-skirts in their Ladies Notions’ Shop on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. In 1872, Bloomingdale’s expanded and opened their East Side Bazaar, a harbinger of the modern "department store."

In 1886, it moved to 59th Street and Lexington Avenue, still their flagship store, anticipating and capitalizing on the northern movement of New York’s upper and middle classes. By 1929, Bloomingdale’s covered an entire city block. Two years later, the glamorous Art Deco edifice that still graces Lexington Avenue was completed. In 1949, Bloomingdale’s began its real expansion, opening its first satellite store in Fresh Meadows, Queens and by 1959, Bloomingdale’s had created a complete circle of stores around the flagship, in New Jersey, Westchester County and Long Island. This dramatic growth continued in the 70’s and 80’s with the opening of stores in the Northeast, Florida, and Chicago. Bloomingdale’s was on its way to becoming a true national entity. That vision culminated in November 1996 with the addition of its first four stores in California, the most ambitious expansion in the company’s history.

From the beginning, the Bloomingdale’s brothers catered to America’s love of international goods, and by the 1880’s, their European selection was dazzling. A buying office in Paris in 1886 was the beginning of a network that now spans the globe. The 1960’s brought promotions resulting from Bloomingdale’s fascination with the foreign market: the first was a small affair called "Casa Bella" featuring merchandise for the home from Italy. Over the next thirty years, the promotions took on a grand scale – including unique merchandise and cultural exhibits that would touch every department in Bloomingdale’s. Major transformation of the Bloomingdale’s image came in the 1960’s and 70’s. The promotions were so exciting that the term "Retailing as Theater" was coined to describe Bloomingdale’s "happenings." It was the era of pet rocks and glacial ice cubes, of visits by movie stars and royalty, from Elizabeth Taylor to Queen Elizabeth II.

The new direction in merchandising was both to seek and to create. Buyers covered the globe to find exclusive, one-of-a-kind items. When they couldn’t find what they wanted, they had it made. In fashion, Bloomingdale’s launched new designers and created boutiques for already-famous names. Among the discoveries: Ralph Lauren, Perry Ellis and Norma Kamali – and for the first time in America: Sonia Rykiel, Kenzo and Fendi ready-to-wear. Designers opening their first in-store boutiques at Bloomingdale’s include Yves St. Laurent, Calvin Klein, Claude Montana and Thierry Mugler.

In 1961, Bloomingdale’s made retail history in yet another area by introducing the first designer shopping bag. Artist Joseph Kinigstein was commissioned to create a bag for the "Esprit de France" promotion. Rather than doing the obvious – ladylike flowers in pastel colors – he reproduced antique French tarot cards in bold red, black and white. Most daring of all, the bag omitted the store name. Even so, it was unmistakably Bloomingdale’s, and the collector’s shopping bag was launched. Since then, Bloomingdale’s bags have been created by both famous and fledgling artists, architects and ad designers. Their designs have been featured in art museums all over the world.

In 1971 "model rooms", a highlight of Bloomingdale’s since 1947, gained worldwide attention. "The Cave," an intricate multi-level frame sprayed entirely in white polyurethane, was a spectacular example of the lengths to which Bloomingdale’s would go to make a statement of style. Over the years, the model rooms have been showcases for the talents of everyone from architect Frank Gehry to filmmaker Federico Fellini.

During the 1970’s, Bloomingdale’s was a favorite stop of the international avant-garde, epitomized locally by the "Young East Sider" who lived right in the neighborhood. In 1973 the store wanted to stamp the Bloomingdale’s name on panties to launch an intimate apparel promotion, they chose the company nickname as a nod to the young, trendy crowd, and the "Bloomie’s" logo was born. Soon, New Yorkers were affectionately referring to the city’s second most popular tourist attraction after the Statue of Liberty as "Bloomie’s" and the hottest souvenir in town was anything emblazoned with "Bloomie’s".

Cool Stamp Collector images

Check out these stamp collector images:

NYC: Bloomingdale’s 2009 Holiday Window – Dynamic Duos – The Obamas
stamp collector
Image by wallyg
Dynamic Duos
Some perfect pairs were meant to go together
One for you and one for me, forever and ever.

Bloomingdale‘s 2009 Holiday window display.

Bloomingdale’s, a chain of upscale American department stores owned by Macy’s, Inc., has 36 stores nationwide, with annual sales of .9 billion dollars. Bloomingdale’s started in 1861 when brothers Joseph and Lyman Bloomingdale started selling hoop-skirts in their Ladies Notions’ Shop on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. In 1872, Bloomingdale’s expanded and opened their East Side Bazaar, a harbinger of the modern "department store."

In 1886, it moved to 59th Street and Lexington Avenue, still their flagship store, anticipating and capitalizing on the northern movement of New York’s upper and middle classes. By 1929, Bloomingdale’s covered an entire city block. Two years later, the glamorous Art Deco edifice that still graces Lexington Avenue was completed. In 1949, Bloomingdale’s began its real expansion, opening its first satellite store in Fresh Meadows, Queens and by 1959, Bloomingdale’s had created a complete circle of stores around the flagship, in New Jersey, Westchester County and Long Island. This dramatic growth continued in the 70’s and 80’s with the opening of stores in the Northeast, Florida, and Chicago. Bloomingdale’s was on its way to becoming a true national entity. That vision culminated in November 1996 with the addition of its first four stores in California, the most ambitious expansion in the company’s history.

From the beginning, the Bloomingdale’s brothers catered to America’s love of international goods, and by the 1880’s, their European selection was dazzling. A buying office in Paris in 1886 was the beginning of a network that now spans the globe. The 1960’s brought promotions resulting from Bloomingdale’s fascination with the foreign market: the first was a small affair called "Casa Bella" featuring merchandise for the home from Italy. Over the next thirty years, the promotions took on a grand scale – including unique merchandise and cultural exhibits that would touch every department in Bloomingdale’s. Major transformation of the Bloomingdale’s image came in the 1960’s and 70’s. The promotions were so exciting that the term "Retailing as Theater" was coined to describe Bloomingdale’s "happenings." It was the era of pet rocks and glacial ice cubes, of visits by movie stars and royalty, from Elizabeth Taylor to Queen Elizabeth II.

The new direction in merchandising was both to seek and to create. Buyers covered the globe to find exclusive, one-of-a-kind items. When they couldn’t find what they wanted, they had it made. In fashion, Bloomingdale’s launched new designers and created boutiques for already-famous names. Among the discoveries: Ralph Lauren, Perry Ellis and Norma Kamali – and for the first time in America: Sonia Rykiel, Kenzo and Fendi ready-to-wear. Designers opening their first in-store boutiques at Bloomingdale’s include Yves St. Laurent, Calvin Klein, Claude Montana and Thierry Mugler.

In 1961, Bloomingdale’s made retail history in yet another area by introducing the first designer shopping bag. Artist Joseph Kinigstein was commissioned to create a bag for the "Esprit de France" promotion. Rather than doing the obvious – ladylike flowers in pastel colors – he reproduced antique French tarot cards in bold red, black and white. Most daring of all, the bag omitted the store name. Even so, it was unmistakably Bloomingdale’s, and the collector’s shopping bag was launched. Since then, Bloomingdale’s bags have been created by both famous and fledgling artists, architects and ad designers. Their designs have been featured in art museums all over the world.

In 1971 "model rooms", a highlight of Bloomingdale’s since 1947, gained worldwide attention. "The Cave," an intricate multi-level frame sprayed entirely in white polyurethane, was a spectacular example of the lengths to which Bloomingdale’s would go to make a statement of style. Over the years, the model rooms have been showcases for the talents of everyone from architect Frank Gehry to filmmaker Federico Fellini.

During the 1970’s, Bloomingdale’s was a favorite stop of the international avant-garde, epitomized locally by the "Young East Sider" who lived right in the neighborhood. In 1973 the store wanted to stamp the Bloomingdale’s name on panties to launch an intimate apparel promotion, they chose the company nickname as a nod to the young, trendy crowd, and the "Bloomie’s" logo was born. Soon, New Yorkers were affectionately referring to the city’s second most popular tourist attraction after the Statue of Liberty as "Bloomie’s" and the hottest souvenir in town was anything emblazoned with "Bloomie’s".

NYC – Bloomingdale’s 2009 Holiday Window – Dynamic Duos – Mark Antony and Cleopatra
stamp collector
Image by wallyg
Dynamic Duos
Some perfect pairs were meant to go together
One for you and one for me, forever and ever.

Bloomingdale‘s 2009 Holiday window display.

Bloomingdale’s, a chain of upscale American department stores owned by Macy’s, Inc., has 36 stores nationwide, with annual sales of .9 billion dollars. Bloomingdale’s started in 1861 when brothers Joseph and Lyman Bloomingdale started selling hoop-skirts in their Ladies Notions’ Shop on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. In 1872, Bloomingdale’s expanded and opened their East Side Bazaar, a harbinger of the modern "department store."

In 1886, it moved to 59th Street and Lexington Avenue, still their flagship store, anticipating and capitalizing on the northern movement of New York’s upper and middle classes. By 1929, Bloomingdale’s covered an entire city block. Two years later, the glamorous Art Deco edifice that still graces Lexington Avenue was completed. In 1949, Bloomingdale’s began its real expansion, opening its first satellite store in Fresh Meadows, Queens and by 1959, Bloomingdale’s had created a complete circle of stores around the flagship, in New Jersey, Westchester County and Long Island. This dramatic growth continued in the 70’s and 80’s with the opening of stores in the Northeast, Florida, and Chicago. Bloomingdale’s was on its way to becoming a true national entity. That vision culminated in November 1996 with the addition of its first four stores in California, the most ambitious expansion in the company’s history.

From the beginning, the Bloomingdale’s brothers catered to America’s love of international goods, and by the 1880’s, their European selection was dazzling. A buying office in Paris in 1886 was the beginning of a network that now spans the globe. The 1960’s brought promotions resulting from Bloomingdale’s fascination with the foreign market: the first was a small affair called "Casa Bella" featuring merchandise for the home from Italy. Over the next thirty years, the promotions took on a grand scale – including unique merchandise and cultural exhibits that would touch every department in Bloomingdale’s. Major transformation of the Bloomingdale’s image came in the 1960’s and 70’s. The promotions were so exciting that the term "Retailing as Theater" was coined to describe Bloomingdale’s "happenings." It was the era of pet rocks and glacial ice cubes, of visits by movie stars and royalty, from Elizabeth Taylor to Queen Elizabeth II.

The new direction in merchandising was both to seek and to create. Buyers covered the globe to find exclusive, one-of-a-kind items. When they couldn’t find what they wanted, they had it made. In fashion, Bloomingdale’s launched new designers and created boutiques for already-famous names. Among the discoveries: Ralph Lauren, Perry Ellis and Norma Kamali – and for the first time in America: Sonia Rykiel, Kenzo and Fendi ready-to-wear. Designers opening their first in-store boutiques at Bloomingdale’s include Yves St. Laurent, Calvin Klein, Claude Montana and Thierry Mugler.

In 1961, Bloomingdale’s made retail history in yet another area by introducing the first designer shopping bag. Artist Joseph Kinigstein was commissioned to create a bag for the "Esprit de France" promotion. Rather than doing the obvious – ladylike flowers in pastel colors – he reproduced antique French tarot cards in bold red, black and white. Most daring of all, the bag omitted the store name. Even so, it was unmistakably Bloomingdale’s, and the collector’s shopping bag was launched. Since then, Bloomingdale’s bags have been created by both famous and fledgling artists, architects and ad designers. Their designs have been featured in art museums all over the world.

In 1971 "model rooms", a highlight of Bloomingdale’s since 1947, gained worldwide attention. "The Cave," an intricate multi-level frame sprayed entirely in white polyurethane, was a spectacular example of the lengths to which Bloomingdale’s would go to make a statement of style. Over the years, the model rooms have been showcases for the talents of everyone from architect Frank Gehry to filmmaker Federico Fellini.

During the 1970’s, Bloomingdale’s was a favorite stop of the international avant-garde, epitomized locally by the "Young East Sider" who lived right in the neighborhood. In 1973 the store wanted to stamp the Bloomingdale’s name on panties to launch an intimate apparel promotion, they chose the company nickname as a nod to the young, trendy crowd, and the "Bloomie’s" logo was born. Soon, New Yorkers were affectionately referring to the city’s second most popular tourist attraction after the Statue of Liberty as "Bloomie’s" and the hottest souvenir in town was anything emblazoned with "Bloomie’s".

Scrap With Me 14 – Reflections Layout – “Collector”

Can you make a layout using just stamps and inks? You betcha! Check out how to use the cool faux leather technique in combination with some simple stamping to create a simple but engaging layout!
Video Rating: 5 / 5

Chinese Fine Arts Society 2010 Stamps Exhibition, Stamp Collector Jiumn Lin Presentation: A History of Opera through Stamps Lecture by Jiumn Lin, Collector

[MIRROR] Taliban Execution – Stoning Execution a Public Execution

hubpages.com hubpages.com Taliban Execution Stoning Execution Public Execution atheist atheism nonstampcollector atheist athiest god atheists atheist videos nonstampcollector atheist cartoons atheist video non stamp collector aithest atheist yahweh freethinker1990 youtube atheist atheist christian god atheism agnostic scientist atheist humor atheistic ahtiest atheast what would jesus not do atheist playlist funny atheist hilarious philosophy of atheism atheist meets god atheisum !!!!PLEASE MIRROR THIS VIDEO!!!!us act. The ruling was upheld in 2007 by Iran’s supreme Sakineh reportedly confessed to the crime of adultery after suffering 99 lashes and now, Sakine Mohammadi Ashtiani, a mother of two living in Iran, is awaiting the execution of her death sentence. She was convicted of adultery in 2006 in the northern city of Tabriz, and although she confessed after being whipped, her lawyer told CNN that she then retracted that confession and denied any adulterocourt. PLEASE DO ALL YOU CAN!
Video Rating: 4 / 5

AUSTRALIAN STAMP MONTHLY 1946-1951 5Volumes News and Articles for Collectors

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